Overstayed China Visa can I ever return to China?

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  • #4514
    Anonymous
    Guest

    I’m an American who was in China a little under 5 years ago.

    I overstayed the maximum, something like 2-3 months, due to a broken ankle.

    I was on a 1-year multi-entry tourist visa, meaning i was supposed to leave every month.

    I was told i had to pay the maximum fine, which seems to be 5,000rmb.

    I asked the US embassy in Shanghai to help me, & they somehow talked China into letting me leave without paying the fine, which is something i haven’t heard of in others’ stories.

    Anyway, awhile later i went to the Chinese embassy (consul?) in Tokyo & applied for a new visa.

    I didn’t expect to get one, just hoped to find out if i could ever return to China.

    They said i couldn’t get back in China, but didn’t know how long or why or if i could pay the fine, etc.

    Can anyone tell me how i can find out if i can pay a fine & return or not?

    Who do i contact to get answers?

    #4795
    Anonymous
    Guest

    I’m an American who was in China a little under 5 years ago.

    I overstayed the maximum, something like 2-3 months, due to a broken ankle.

    I was on a 1-year multi-entry tourist visa, meaning i was supposed to leave every month.

    I was told i had to pay the maximum fine, which seems to be 5,000rmb.

    I asked the US embassy in Shanghai to help me, & they somehow talked China into letting me leave without paying the fine, which is something i haven’t heard of in others’ stories.

    Anyway, awhile later i went to the Chinese embassy (consul?) in Tokyo & applied for a new visa.

    I didn’t expect to get one, just hoped to find out if i could ever return to China.

    They said i couldn’t get back in China, but didn’t know how long or why or if i could pay the fine, etc.

    Can anyone tell me how i can find out if i can pay a fine & return or not?

    Who do i contact to get answers?

    #4796
    Anonymous
    Guest

    You are not the brightest light bulb in the shelf, isn’t it? Renewing the visa is no problem. You should have gotten a medical report stating that you are unable to travel and a good local agent (and maybe some RMBs for the agents efforts). That would have done the trick.

    #4797
    Anonymous
    Guest

    I was really nervous a few years back during the Olympics visa crunch. I got my 10-day GTFO visa and I thought that was it. But I went home and did things (semi) properly and got a Z from the embassy in DC. But then I thought, just wait until you try to get through Immigration! No prob. Ah, but just wait until you try to get your RP! Again, no problem.

    No one said boo until two or three visas later, when I went to Pudong to get an L extended. Sniveling b!tch flipped around my passport looking for evidence of atrocities. A-ha! She about had a fit over this two-year-old exit visa. I tried to explain that I had been tricked by some shady visa company that I’d been referred to by my employer. Ah, but how to account for hundreds of years of humiliation? She went to get a supervisor. I smiled. Real good and honest. He said never mind.

    Anyway, give a rule-crazy pig farmer a badge, and she can make things difficult. Even if you’d thought you were in the clear.

    #4798
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Hi. After living in China for 4 years I got a similar problem, I overstayed my Visa and they asked me to leave the country.

    Many people told me don’t even try to go to Hong Kong to get the Z visa becouse they would deny it to me, but finally didn’t found any problem getting done the Z Visa in HK and after the resident permit in China.

    I would advice you to contact with one or more agencies first of all explaining them your situation.

    Cheer up!

    #5518
    Anonymous
    Guest

    There are some people that think purchasing Demand Drafts is the BEST option to get your money out of China, but after having done it several times, I now think that if you value your TIME, it’s doesn’t offer a huge advantage over Telegraphic Transfer (wiring the funds).

    Last time I went to Bank of China for a Demand Draft, there was no line so I was able to go straight to the teller without a wait, but the transaction itself took 90 minutes. 90 minutes! And then, of course, there may be a bit of a wait when you have to go back to pick it up. In my several Demand Draft transactions, I was only once able to receive it immediately after purchasing. All the other times, the manager needed for the signature was not around so I had to come back at a later date for pick-up. You must have an account at BoC and your ATM card with you in order to purchase a Demand Draft there.

    For an idea on fees at BoC for a Demand Draft, it is a little over 90 RMB for 15,000USD or a bit over 50RMB for 5,000USD.

    At ICBC there is a 150 RMB fee for an outgoing wire, plus a small percentage of the amount being transferred, with a MAXIMUM that is actually very reasonable (though i forget the exact figure). I think if you are a VIP customer at certain banks, it could be even cheaper. Bear in mind that your bank accounts abroad will charge a fee for an incoming wire, my American banks charge $15.

    Many tout the greatness of Remote Deposit for the Demand Drafts, but my banks in the US have low maximum daily/monthly aggregates when using the Remote Deposit feature for Personal accounts, so for my circumstances, a Telegraphic Transfer is both more time and cost efficient for international remittance of LARGE sums.

    #5519
    Anonymous
    Guest

    I would tend to agree…and even go a bit further if one’s intent is to is ‘physically follow/accompany’ the money for.

    If one is transferring funds for use while they are in the ‘home’ country, it is just as simple to simply take the same time required to convert RMB to USD and to simply carry the cash.

    Given the absurdly low conversion limits ($500/day – and where, like with the Internet, while some will complain, the system is functioning precisely as designed to discourage such activity), it is easiest in terms of time and cost to convert and simply carry the cash – providing one also follow the simple customs reporting requirements and that the transfer does not exceed any allowable limits.

    Otherwise, if the purpose is simply to transfer the funds into another account allowing further potential processing by compatible systems, then Western Union wire transfer seems to be the simplest, least expensive means – especially if your time has value.

    While complaining is a waste of time, it is amazing how an electronic transfer transaction that requires no human interaction by bank personnel is used purely for revenue generation and that we actually line up before being told to bend over by the oh so altruistic banks.

    #5520
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Hi,

    One question about oversea money transfer: I absolutely need to send money on monthly basis, around 4k EUR each time. If I use bank transfer I need to go to Tax bureau first to obtain the right to purchase such amount in USD and then send it to a French account with Bank of China.

    Now with Western Union, do I still need a tax authorization to send more than 500 USD at a time? Can I go directly with 25000 RMB and have a code to take it back in france?

    Thanks for your answer!

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